Tools to build better Tools faster

Behind every lofty architecture mantra there is mundane execution. This is best left to tools and I don’t mean anybody in particular but programs that help us make better programs. It basically goes like this: Build tool. Use tool. Build better tool. Build tool to build better tool. Build better tool to build better tool faster. And so on. Implementing this in practice can be quite boring but the alternative is to do boring things again and again and again and that’s enough already. So let’s see.

Maintaining 100+ libraries and programs involves doing a few things over and over again. Automating these seems natural but requires some thought. Developers want to spend their time in interesting and useful ways. Querying and manipulating git repositories is repetitive. Updating a changelog file with a select subset of messages also present in the git commits is repetitive. Rewriting project metadata and updating CI jobs for new PHPUnit and PHP versions or base operating systems is repetitive and requires no brains at all, why should I do this 100+ times?

Off the shelf tools

Using tools that already exist and are maintained by other parties is a no-brainer. Which tools can help?

  • PHPUnit helps us spot and eliminate regressions before any user is affected. The tool itself is maintained by Sebastian Bergmann but writing and upgrading the actual test code is a chore.
  • PHPStan or Psalm – I prefer PHPStan – are static analyzers which help developers spot places where signatures, types and assumptions don’t add up. To get the best out of it, either phpdoc annotations or parameter and return types must be added. No tests to write, which is good – but PHPStan is organized in progressively strict levels and each library needs to be checked against the level it is supposed to pass. Micromanaging that is boring as hell, tools are needed.
  • php-cs-fixer is developed by friendsofphp – it is a basic code manipulation tool which helps anywhere from adhering to PSR-12 or PER-1 to automatically upgrading from array() to [] notation. Configuring this beast is easy but ensuring the most current rules are used in every project is another burden.
  • rector is another tool that transpiles code either up or down to select standards. It will move implicit knowledge or phpdoc data into actual code or do the different thing. It will choose older ways to express something over new ones or vice versa. Configuring it to do only what is helpful is quite a challenge. Also ensuring the most recent config is used is just boring and cumbersome. Tool needed.

Homegrown tools

The horde project has some home grown tools that can help but need development themselves.

  • horde/git-tools by Michael Rubinsky used to be the way to assemble a bleeding edge developer copy from zillions of github repos. In a modern composer based installation this tool is less useful but it contains a lot of interesting capabilities that should be factored out
  • horde/components can generate composer and pear metadata from a self-defined yaml format. It can create tar archives from repositories, implements a basic workflow engine for release and quality check tasks and does some other things. Its internal architecture is rooted in history and while some of its functionality seems out of touch with 2022, many other parts deserve expanding or factoring out into modern self-contained libraries for reuse.
  • horde/hordectl is a command line tool to interact with a Horde installation. Inject users and passwords, configure permissions, groups or app-specific resources from yaml files and defaults. It needs some upgrading, it could do so much more to facilitate proof of concept, showcase or CI installations.
  • horde/horde-installer-plugin is a plugin for composer that helps bootstrap a horde installation and its web-readable part. Much of its code would best be moved out to separate libraries.

Building blocks

Existing and new libraries should inherit functionality moved out from existing tools or newly created

  • horde/vcs is a version control library. Its main origin are the horde/chora application and the installation/development tools. Recently I began to move or re-implement code from git-tools and horde/components into this library. I am less interested in the rcs, cvs and svn parts. The original library followed an approach abstracting the differences between git, cvs, svn & friends. This limits its usefulness. I see how it facilitates creating an application that consumes and shows code from these. Still, there should be a lower level of abstraction that provides the unique capabilities of git in a programmatic fashion. This is one thing I currently work on
  • horde/rampage used to be a dead end but I am reusing the library for deployment and introspection related code factored out from other tools.
  • horde/filesystem is a new library, focused on object-oriented filesystem traversal and manipulation. Still very immature but I hope to turn it into a standalone and reusable tool.
  • horde/registry is the stub of an upcoming redesign of the core bootstrapping process. No more globals, reliance on PSR-11 DI containers and PSR-4 autoloading – this registry will do less than its ancestors yet be much more powerful and easy to use. This is still much work.
  • horde/cli_modular is a tool to write extensible, pluggable commandline interfaces. It is used by horde/git-tools, horde/components, horde/hordectl and a few others. In the current upgrade cycle some redesign is necessary to make it viable for modern environments and free it from problems already solved by autoloaders or DI containers.

So much work to do but devoting some time to better tools is better than doing mindless conversions of existing code over and over.

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